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Giúp mình nhé Word form: Sociological research points to the theory that certain ways of positioning pr moving the body have a direct ( CORRELATE ) ................ with how one is perceived. People emit an aura of strength or power dependent on posture, gestures and eye movement. Quick, enthusiastic, (MEAN)................movements and gestures suggest a dynamic, alert person. People who look at, and maintain eye contact with their audience while conversing with them exude confidence and (FEAR)................. Somebody who is relaxed enough to stand before his audience without any (VISION)...............signs of stress exudes self-assuredness and honesty. Even though these people are comfortable in their stance, they hold themselves erect and avoid looking round-shouldered or hunched over. Being lazy with one’s posture could be (INDICATE).................of defeat, while standing tall and proud paints a picture of one who is in charge. Being conscious of one’s posture and gestures when sitting is also (CONDUCT).................to creating the right impression on the (HOLD)................ When one wishes to appear self-assured and knowledgeable in an important (PERSON)...............situation where sitting is required, a high, straight-backed chair should be chosen when possible. Placing and clasping the hands behind the head, with elbows stretched to the sides, adds to the impression of comfortable (ASSERT)............... It also keeps the hands under control and out of danger of (WANT)...............fidgeting.

Diệp Vi
Diệp Vi 3 tháng 8 2020 lúc 18:48

Giúp mình nhé Word form: Sociological research points to the theory that certain ways of positioning pr moving the body have a direct ( CORRELATE ) ......correlation.......... with how one is perceived. People emit an aura of strength or power dependent on posture, gestures and eye movement. Quick, enthusiastic, (MEAN)...meaningful.............movements and gestures suggest a dynamic, alert person. People who look at, and maintain eye contact with their audience while conversing with them exude confidence and (FEAR)........fearlessness......... Somebody who is relaxed enough to stand before his audience without any (VISION)......visual.........signs of stress exudes self-assuredness and honesty. Even though these people are comfortable in their stance, they hold themselves erect and avoid looking round-shouldered or hunched over. Being lazy with one’s posture could be (INDICATE)..........indicator.......of defeat, while standing tall and proud paints a picture of one who is in charge. Being conscious of one’s posture and gestures when sitting is also (CONDUCT).....conducive............to creating the right impression on the (HOLD).......holder......... When one wishes to appear self-assured and knowledgeable in an important (PERSON)......personal.........situation where sitting is required, a high, straight-backed chair should be chosen when possible. Placing and clasping the hands behind the head, with elbows stretched to the sides, adds to the impression of comfortable (ASSERT).......assertion........ It also keeps the hands under control and out of danger of (WANT).....unwanting..........fidgeting.

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I. Rewrite each of the following sentences, using the suggested word.

1. My school has conducted several volunteer programs to raise students' awareness of helping others. (BEEN)

2. My grandfather became deaf when he turned 70 years old. (SINCE)

3. James last visited his mother, who has been living in the nursing home, in December. (NOT)

4. Helen and her boyfriend haven't gone on a date for ages. (IT)

5. When Maria started college, she stopped doing volunteer work. (SINCE)

II. Read the passage and choose the best answer to each of the following questions.

four great reasons for high school students to volunteer

Volunteer work presents a great opportunity for teenagers to prepare for the future, as well as to improve their communities. In addition to boosting socializing skills and awareness of local organizations and social issues, high school students who volunteer often may have an advantage over their peers when headed off to college.

1. Gaining New Skills

With each new volunteer activity, students gain new skills. The skills seem to be basic or trivial at the time of training, but may provide fundamental grounds for future success. For example, For example, by managing the receipt, sorting and distributing the donations from community, school students might learn how to use spreadsheets to keep track of inventory. These skills are a great foundation for a job in management, accounting, or running a small business.

2. Giving Time

One of the most charitable acts anyone can do is donate their time and talents. Students who are busy with after-school sports or work to help support their families and still make time to volunteer on evenings or weekends show their outstanding character and resolve to make a difference. High school students may help to mentor younger ones or to assist with one-time special events held on weekends.

3. Showing Responsibility

Just like going to a job, committing to a volunteer position shows a student's responsibility. High school students should get involved in volunteer programs relating to their hobbies in order to naturally build responsibility. For example, those who love to read can find volunteer opportunities with a local library and those who enjoy sports can coach athletics at an after-school program for children.

4. Adding to the Resume

If a high school student's pre-college resume is limited to summer employment at a local restaurant or a cafe. it might be time to add a few lines. Commitment to community volunteer work over a long time shows that a student is willing to work for something without monetary compensation, including a college internship or apprenticeship, which may be a requirement of college programs.

1. According to the passage, who is volunteer work beneficial to?

A. high school students

B. students' communities

C. both students and communities

D. none of them

2. The word 'trivial' in paragraph 2 most closely means ________

A. important

B. significant

C. of little importance

D. fundamental

3. According to the passage, what job will the students' skill of using spreadsheets be useful to?

A. a manager

B. an accountant

C. a business owner

D. all of them

4. Why should busy students make their time to volunteer?

A. to demonstrate their excellent quality

B. to show their outstanding outcomes

C. to support their families

D. to develop their talents

5. According to the passage, what volunteer programs help to develop students' responsibility?

A. The programs are related to their future jobs

B. The programs are related to their interests

C. The programs are available after school

D. The programs are held by their local library

6. What volunteer work may be suitable for a student who likes sports?

A. working in a local library

B. joining a football team in their school

C. being a sport instructor at a primary school

D. coaching a football program for children after school hours

7. The phrase 'it might be time to add a few lines' in paragraph 5 most closely means________

A. Some more lines should be added in your resume

B. Much volunteer work must be included in your resume

C. You might spend more time to write your resume

D. Your resume should include your experience in volunteering

8. What may be a requirement of college programs for their future students?

A. being able to work over time

B. agreeing to work as a paid apprentice

C. being willing to work without being paid

D. being employed before

III. Read the text and decide whether the sentences are true (T) or false (F)

USAID IN Vietnam

Assisting persons with disabilities has long been one of the top priorities for the U.S. Government in Vietnam. Since 1989, with the establishment of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Leahy War Victims Fund (LWVF), USAID is working to increase the availability of and access to a wide variety of programs benefiting people with disabilities in conflict-affected countries.

In Vietnam, U. S. assistance has helped address medical needs and support the inclusion of Vietnamese with disabilities into all aspects of society. The U.S. Government has contributed more than $80 million in assistance to persons with disabilities, has improved the lives of more than 30,000 persons with disabilities, and has strengthened the Government of Vietnam’s capacity to provide high quality services to those in need. USAID has provided rehabilitation services for tens of thousands of persons with disabilities, education and vocational training including information technology, job placement, supporting parent associations to expand the advocacy for disability issues, and support for the development of legal codes to improve physical accessibility for persons with disabilities in public buildings.

USAID'S work supporting persons with disabilities is also viewed by many as contributing to successful US-Vietnam cooperation to overcome the painful past shared by the two countries. Program activities work in three areas: policy advocacy and coordination, direct assistance including occupational and physical therapy and providing assistive devices, and health systems strengthening, to provide quality disabilities-related care and treatment. Persons with disabilities have been more readily integrated into society by improving their access to health, education and social services. USAID programs support local governments in implementing the national disability law and the U.N. Convention on the rights of Persons with disabilities, and influencing public policies that affect the lives of persons with disabilities.

1. USAID was established in 1989 _____

2. USAID aims to make various programs benefiting all people in conflict-affected countries ___________

3. Addressing medical needs of Vietnamese people is the priority of U.S assistance in Vietnam ___________

4. American government has made an $80 million contribution to help disabled people in Vietnam __________

5. Thanks to USAID, more high quality services are provided to disabled people in Vietnam __________

6. USAID has helped to rehabilitate only a limited number of persons with disabilities in Vietnam __________

7. USAID work makes a great contribution to the success of US-Vietnam cooperation ___________

8. The main focus of USAID activities is providing direct assistance with occupation replacement and health treatment for the disabled. ___________

9. Having better access to health, education and social services, the disabled in Vietnam have become more integrated into society ___________

10. Thanks to USAID programs, the Vietnam's national disability law and the U.N. Convention on the Rights of persons with disabilities have been enforced ___________

Minh Nguyễn Đức
Minh Nguyễn Đức

Read the following article about ice-skating. Choose the most suitable heading from the list A-I for each part (1-8) of the article.

A. Prepare yourself

B. The benefits of the sport

C. When things go wrong

D. Different skating techniques

E. A change in approach

F. The right attitude

G. Moving off

H. Holding your body correctly

I. How it all started

1...... Ice skating has a history of thousands of years. Archaelogists have discovered skates made from animal bone. It seems that bone skates were used until the introduction of iron into Scandinavia about the year 200 AD. Among the Scandinavian upper classes, skating was seen as an essential skill. 2.......

In the early 20th century, skating was stylish and reserved, but at the 1924 Winter Olympics, 11-year-old Sonja Henie introduced a more athletic attitude which inspired a new wave of popularity. Nowadays art and athletics are combined and modern skating is both graceful and physically demanding. 3...... For the beginner, balance and control are still important and speed can only increase with proficiency. The position of your body plays a great part in the balance. Legs slightly bowed and the knees bent keep the body weight centred; in effect the body leans slightly forward in this position. For skating, probably more than any other sport or recreation, relaxation is vital. 4...... For the starting position, the heels shoould almost be touching and the feet should be turned outwards. While pushing forward with the back foot, you make a very small movement with the other foot. Fairly easy, isn't it? If you can keep this up for a while, you can then slowly increase the length of your movements as you gain experience. 5...... Knowing how to fall must be learned among the skater's first skills. Even the best of the professionals fall. In order to fall without injury, you should be as relaxed as possible. In this way the shock of hitting the ice is lessened. To get up, use your hands to get into a kneeling position, then stand. 6...... Once you have learned to move on the ice with confidence, there are various styles to be practised - figure skaing, free style, distance, speed, skating in pairs and so on - but the basis of them all, and by far the best approach, is first to learn figure skating and then elementary freestyle. With proper guidance available at most of the ice rinks troughout the country, the basic figures can soon be learned and the turns, jumps and spins of elementary free style will soon follow. 7...... If you look at any good or professional skater, you will see how relaxed they are and how easily they move. To achieve this an expertise programme should be regularly practised. It can be dangerous to skate with a stiff body and warm-up exercises should at least include those for the legs, back and shoulders, with special emphasis on the ankles and knees. After a long or intense session, the same exercises should be used afterwards to avoid stiffness. 8...... Skating improves balance, co-ordination, relaxation and movement. It improves heart and lung activity and generally strengthens the body. Combined with swimming or jogging, it provides a great programme for all-round health and fitness.

Nguyễn Thị Minh Trang

The little chefs Hilary Rose travels to Dorset, in the south of England, to investigate a cookery course for children. There must be something in the air in Dorset, because the last place you’d expect to fi nd children during the summer holidays is in the kitchen. Yet in a farmhouse, deep in the English countryside, that’s exactly where they are – on a cookery course designed especially for children. It’s all the idea of Anna Wilson, who wants to educate young children about cooking and eating in a healthy way. ‘I’m very keen to plant the idea in their heads that food doesn’t grow on supermarket shelves,’ she explains. ‘The course is all about making food fun and enjoyable.’ She thinks that eight is the perfect age to start teaching children to cook, because at that age they are always hungry. 9() These children are certainly all smiles as they arrive at the country farmhouse. Three girls and four boys aged from ten to thirteen make up the group. They are immediately given a tour of what will be ‘home’ for the next 48 hours. 10 But one thing is quite clear – they all have a genuine interest in food and learning how to cook. Anna has worked as a chef in all sorts of situations and has even cooked for the crew of a racing yacht, in limited space and diffi cult weather conditions. 11 ‘Kids are easy to teach,’ she insists, ‘because they’re naturally curious and if you treat them like adults they listen to you.’ Back in the kitchen, Anna is giving the introductory talk, including advice on keeping hands clean, and being careful around hot ovens. 12 Judging by the eager looks on their young faces as they watch Anna’s demonstration, they are just keen to start cooking. The children learn the simplest way, by watching and then doing it themselves. They gather round as Anna chops an onion for the fi rst evening meal. Then the boys compete with each other to chop their onions as fast as possible, while the girls work carefully, concentrating on being neat. 13 When they learn to make bread, the girls knead the dough with their hands competently, while the boys punch it into the board, cheerfully hitting the table with their fi sts. The following morning, four boys with dark shadows under their eyes stumble into the kitchen at 8.30 a.m. to learn how to make breakfast (sausages and eggs, and fruit drinks made with yoghurt and honey). We learn later that they didn’t stop talking until 4.30 a.m. 14 Ignoring this, Anna brightly continues trying to persuade everyone that fruit drinks are just as interesting as sausages and eggs. Anna has great plans for the courses and is reluctant to lower her standards in any way, even though her students are so young. 15 ‘And I like to keep the course fees down,’ Anna adds, ‘because if the children enjoy it and go on to teach their own children to cook, I feel it’s worth it.’ If this course doesn’t inspire them to cook, nothing will.

A This is followed by a session on ‘knife skills’, which will be important later on.

B She always uses top- quality ingredients, such as the best cuts of meat and the fi nest cheeses, so there’s clearly no profi t motive in this operation.

C As they wander round, they argue lightheartedly about who has had the most experience in the kitchen.

D In the garden, they learn about the herbs that they will use in their cooking.

E Their obvious tiredness may explain why one of them goes about the task so carelessly that the ingredients end up on the fl oor.

F This is particularly true of young boys, who are happy to do anything that will end in a meal.

G As a result, she has a very relaxed attitude to cooking, constantly encouraging the children and never talking down to them.

H This contrast will become something of a theme during the course.

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